CEPRAVIN’S LONGER CONTACT TIME GIVES A GREATER OPPORTUNITY TO CURE INFECTIONS

The reason for Dry Cow Therapy (DCT) being more effective than treatment during lactation is that the antibiotic can be kept in contact with bacteria for a longer period.

With long-acting DCT the concentration of antibiotic is kept high enough to kill bacteria for longer, especially deeper in the udder tissues.

In an Australian trial9 cure rates were better for Cepravin than Orbenin Enduro® (80.3% vs. 70.6%). This may have been due to the difference in the active, but the length of activity is also likely to have played a role.

9
Shephard et al. (2004). A comparative field trial of cephalonium and cloxacillin for dry cow therapy for mastitis in Australian dairy cows. AVJ.
CEPRAVIN PREVENTS FLARE UPS OF CLINICAL MASTITIS THROUGHOUT THE DRY PERIOD

This is especially important if it is not possible to observe the cows closely. Cepravin has been shown in New Zealand to reduce the incidence of dry period mastitis from 12.3% to 1.2% during the dry period and at calving.4

It was in this trial that Cepravin, the long-acting DCT used, was shown to hasten the formation of the keratin plug in the teat canal. This effect has not been shown with other DCTs.

The results from the Williamson trial have been duplicated in a number of other trials both here and overseas.5,15,16

In a comparative trial in Waikato,8 animals treated with Cepravin were 20 times less likely to get clinical mastitis than the controls during the dry period. Cows treated with Bovaclox were five times less likely to get clinical mastitis than controls during the dry period.

4
Williamson J.H. et al. (1995). The prophylactic effect of a dry-cow antibiotic against Streptococcus uberis. NZVJ.
5
Woolford M. W. et al. (1998). The prophylactic effect of a teat sealer on bovine mastitis during the dry period and the following lactation. NZVJ.
8
McKay B. (1998, 1999). MSD Animal Health data on file
15
McDougall et al. (2011). A randomised, non-inferiority trial of a new cephalonium dry-cow therapy. NZVJ.
16
Berry and Hillerton (2002). The effect of selective dry cow treatment on new intramammary infections. J Dairy Sci.
" Cepravin has
been shown
to reduce the
incidence of
dry period
mastitis from
12.3% to 1.2%4 "
CEPRAVIN REDUCES MASTITIS INTO THE FOLLOWING LACTATION

Much of the mastitis seen during calving and in early lactation is due to bacteria that have been picked up in the dry period.

New Zealand trial work has shown that long-acting therapy reduces mastitis well into the season. Ruakura studies showed a reduction in clinical mastitis in cows treated with Cepravin.

In the Williamson trial4 there was a reduction of 43% up until March, while Woolford’s work5 demonstrated a reduction of 50% in the first 5 months of lactation.

4
Williamson J.H. et al. (1995). The prophylactic effect of a dry-cow antibiotic against Streptococcus uberis. NZVJ.
5
Woolford M. W. et al. (1998). The prophylactic effect of a teat sealer on bovine mastitis during the dry period and the following lactation. NZVJ.
" In the Williamson
trial there was a
reduction of 43%
up until March4. "
" While Woolford's
work demonstrated
a reduction of 50%
in the first 5 months
of lactation5. "
CEPRAVIN HAS BEEN SHOWN TO REDUCE THE BULK TANK SOMATIC CELL COUNT (BTSCC) OF THE HERD

New Zealand studies have shown that increasing the percentage of the herd treated with Cepravin decreases the SCC. Local studies have showed significant decreases in SCCs in quarters treated with Cepravin compared with untreated controls (a reduction of 49% in infected cows).4

Cepravin has been shown to deliver significantly lower SCCs at the start of lactation than shorter-acting Orbenin Enduro®* (189,000 vs. 388,000 cells/mL).11

The level of SCCs at the start of the season is correlated with the level throughout the season.

4
Williamson J.H. et al. (1995). The prophylactic effect of a dry-cow antibiotic against Streptococcus uberis. NZVJ.
11
Parkinson T. et al. (2000). Comparative efficacy of three dry-cow antibiotic formulations in spring calving in New Zealand dairy cows. NZVJ.